Violently loud thoughts of a quiet girl

624,447 notes

akanedee:

if you ever call me annoying, even if it’s just jokingly, the chances of me ever speaking to you again are slim to none because I’ll be so afraid that every little word or sound that comes out of my mouth will aggravate you and make you cringe and hate my existence

(via candleforthedevil)

85,201 notes

cantthinkofanameohwell:

atopfourthwall:

gryffindorgeek7777:

mad-piper-with-a-box:

thetomska:

giddytf2:

the-last-teabender:

Robin Thicke is unapologetic about how rapey ‘Blurred Lines’ is, meanwhile the dude who parodied it issues a public apology for one word.

And that is just one reason why I love Weird Al.

It’s great that he’s addressed this but are we really supposed to believe that NO ONE during the extremely lengthy processes of writing a song, recording it, mastering it and animating the music video wouldn’t have brought it up?

Excuse me but how the hell is spastic even remotely insulting?

So I just recently learned that in the UK calling someone spastic means the same thing as calling someone retarded, only much worse.
If it makes people in the UK feel any better, people in the US literally do not know this (like literally no one I have ever met and/or know). Here being spastic is usually meant to mean something along the lines of acting like a hyper-active child (like running around in circles yelling just because they feel like it please be quiet for just 2 minutes type of child). NOBODY here uses it as a slur.
Since Weird Al is a US musician and the US music industry is pretty non-international, yeah actually I think its entirely possible that none of the people who worked on this song actually knew that spastic was considered an awful slur in some parts of the world.
And I’m like 99.9999% sure that Weird Al is genuinely very sorry that he was accidentally offensive.

Hence why in the US there are occasionally insults on TV or the like with “Spaz” or, on MST3K in particular, “Spaz Attack.” I used to use it myself back in the earlier AT4W episodes, but people soon corrected me and I don’t use it anymore. And I’m sure Al won’t, either.  ^_^

Yep-In the UK the word was originally used to refer to people with Cerebral Palsy, but fell quickly out of official/medical use when it started being used as an insult towards disabled people, both physically and mentally, in general. Supposedly it’s considered one of the most taboo insults in Britain and tbh I can believe that

cantthinkofanameohwell:

atopfourthwall:

gryffindorgeek7777:

mad-piper-with-a-box:

thetomska:

giddytf2:

the-last-teabender:

Robin Thicke is unapologetic about how rapey ‘Blurred Lines’ is, meanwhile the dude who parodied it issues a public apology for one word.

And that is just one reason why I love Weird Al.

It’s great that he’s addressed this but are we really supposed to believe that NO ONE during the extremely lengthy processes of writing a song, recording it, mastering it and animating the music video wouldn’t have brought it up?

Excuse me but how the hell is spastic even remotely insulting?

So I just recently learned that in the UK calling someone spastic means the same thing as calling someone retarded, only much worse.

If it makes people in the UK feel any better, people in the US literally do not know this (like literally no one I have ever met and/or know). Here being spastic is usually meant to mean something along the lines of acting like a hyper-active child (like running around in circles yelling just because they feel like it please be quiet for just 2 minutes type of child). NOBODY here uses it as a slur.

Since Weird Al is a US musician and the US music industry is pretty non-international, yeah actually I think its entirely possible that none of the people who worked on this song actually knew that spastic was considered an awful slur in some parts of the world.

And I’m like 99.9999% sure that Weird Al is genuinely very sorry that he was accidentally offensive.

Hence why in the US there are occasionally insults on TV or the like with “Spaz” or, on MST3K in particular, “Spaz Attack.” I used to use it myself back in the earlier AT4W episodes, but people soon corrected me and I don’t use it anymore. And I’m sure Al won’t, either.  ^_^

Yep-In the UK the word was originally used to refer to people with Cerebral Palsy, but fell quickly out of official/medical use when it started being used as an insult towards disabled people, both physically and mentally, in general. Supposedly it’s considered one of the most taboo insults in Britain and tbh I can believe that

(via gliitchproof)